Rezando com O´Donohue

TO BE BORN IS TO BE CHOSEN.
( Pe. John O´Donohue*).
To be born is to be chosen. Benjamin Foust
No one is here by accident. Each one of us was sent here for a special destiny. When a fact is read in a spiritual way, its deeper meaning often emerges.When you consider the moment of conception, there are endless possibilities. Yet in most cases, only one child is conceived. This seems to suggest that a certain selectivity is already at work. This selectivity intimates a sheltering providence that dreamed you, created you, and always minds you. You were not consulted on the major factors that shaped your destiny: when you were to be born; where you would be born; to whom you would be born. Imagine the difference it would have made to your life had you been born into the house next door. Your identity was not offered for your choosing. In other words, a special destiny was prepared for you. But you were also given freedom and creativity to go beyond the given, to make a new set of relationships and to forge an ever new identity, inclusive of the old but not limited to it. This is the secret pulse of growth, which is quietly at work behind the outer facade of your life. Destiny sets the outer frame of experience and life; freedom finds and fills its inner form.

For millions of years, before you arrived here, the dream of your individuality was carefully prepared. You were sent to a shape of destiny in which you would be able to express the special gift you bring to the world. Sometimes this gift may involve suffering and pain that can neither be accounted for nor explained. There is a unique destiny for each person. Each one of us has something to do here that can be done by no one else. If someone else could fulfill your destiny, then they would be in your place, and you would not be here. It is in the depths of your life that you will discover the invisible necessity that has brought you here. When you begin to decipher this, your gift and giftedness come alive. Your heart quickens and the urgency of living rekindles your creativity.

If you can awaken this sense of destiny, you come you rhythm with your kife. You fall out of rhythm when you renege on your potential and talent, when you settle for the mediocre as a refuge from the call. When you lose rhythm, your life becomes wearyingly deliberate or anonymously automatic. Rhythm is the secret key to balance and belonging. This will not collapse into false contentment or passivity. It is the rhythm of a dynamic equilibrium, a readiness of spirit, a poise that is not self-centered. This sense of rhythm is ancient. All life came out of the ocean; each one of us comes out of the waters of the womb; the ebb and flow of the tides is alive in the ebb and flow of our breathing. When you are in rhythm with your nature, nothing destructive can touch you. Providence is at one with you; it minds you and brings you to your new horizons. To be spiritual is to be in rhythm.

Da prece que encerra cada capítulo, retirei esse trecho (porque pertinente ao que estou vivendo hoje):
(…) “May you realize that shape of your soul is unique, that you have a special destiny here,
“May you learn to see yourself with the same delight, pride, and expectation with which God sees you in every moment.”
(…)
AMEM!
+++++
Fonte: O’Donohue, John. “Anam Cara: a book of Celtic wisdom”. Harper-Perennial. New York, 1997.
Post-post (1)
Ao que vai nascer: escolhemos teu nome: Benjamin, entre as tribos de Judá. Tua avó e eu (vovö Boy e vovö girl) te esperamos. Teu pai Craig Foust, tua mamãe Maíra Q. Foust (nosso primeiro bebê bem-amado); tua tia Ceci (nossa “benjamine”), tua bisavó Carmelita, tuas tias e tios, tua grandma e teu granpa, teu irmãozinho Lucas (um cara especialíssimo), teu tio-adotivo (e padrinho do Lucas) te esperamos! Rezamos por ti, pequenino Queiroz Foust! E te esperamos com Esperança e Amor nos nossos corações…

Rezando com O´Donohue

TO BE BORN IS TO BE CHOSEN.
( Pe. John O´Donohue*).
To be born is to be chosen. Benjamin Foust
No one is here by accident. Each one of us was sent here for a special destiny. When a fact is read in a spiritual way, its deeper meaning often emerges.When you consider the moment of conception, there are endless possibilities. Yet in most cases, only one child is conceived. This seems to suggest that a certain selectivity is already at work. This selectivity intimates a sheltering providence that dreamed you, created you, and always minds you. You were not consulted on the major factors that shaped your destiny: when you were to be born; where you would be born; to whom you would be born. Imagine the difference it would have made to your life had you been born into the house next door. Your identity was not offered for your choosing. In other words, a special destiny was prepared for you. But you were also given freedom and creativity to go beyond the given, to make a new set of relationships and to forge an ever new identity, inclusive of the old but not limited to it. This is the secret pulse of growth, which is quietly at work behind the outer facade of your life. Destiny sets the outer frame of experience and life; freedom finds and fills its inner form.

For millions of years, before you arrived here, the dream of your individuality was carefully prepared. You were sent to a shape of destiny in which you would be able to express the special gift you bring to the world. Sometimes this gift may involve suffering and pain that can neither be accounted for nor explained. There is a unique destiny for each person. Each one of us has something to do here that can be done by no one else. If someone else could fulfill your destiny, then they would be in your place, and you would not be here. It is in the depths of your life that you will discover the invisible necessity that has brought you here. When you begin to decipher this, your gift and giftedness come alive. Your heart quickens and the urgency of living rekindles your creativity.

If you can awaken this sense of destiny, you come you rhythm with your kife. You fall out of rhythm when you renege on your potential and talent, when you settle for the mediocre as a refuge from the call. When you lose rhythm, your life becomes wearyingly deliberate or anonymously automatic. Rhythm is the secret key to balance and belonging. This will not collapse into false contentment or passivity. It is the rhythm of a dynamic equilibrium, a readiness of spirit, a poise that is not self-centered. This sense of rhythm is ancient. All life came out of the ocean; each one of us comes out of the waters of the womb; the ebb and flow of the tides is alive in the ebb and flow of our breathing. When you are in rhythm with your nature, nothing destructive can touch you. Providence is at one with you; it minds you and brings you to your new horizons. To be spiritual is to be in rhythm.

Da prece que encerra cada capítulo, retirei esse trecho (porque pertinente ao que estou vivendo hoje):
(…) “May you realize that shape of your soul is unique, that you have a special destiny here,
“May you learn to see yourself with the same delight, pride, and expectation with which God sees you in every moment.”
(…)
AMEM!
+++++
Fonte: O’Donohue, John. “Anam Cara: a book of Celtic wisdom”. Harper-Perennial. New York, 1997.
Post-post (1)
Ao que vai nascer: escolhemos teu nome: Benjamin, entre as tribos de Judá. Tua avó e eu (vovö Boy e vovö girl) te esperamos. Teu pai Craig Foust, tua mamãe Maíra Q. Foust (nosso primeiro bebê bem-amado); tua tia Ceci (nossa “benjamine”), tua bisavó Carmelita, tuas tias e tios, tua grandma e teu granpa, teu irmãozinho Lucas (um cara especialíssimo), teu tio-adotivo (e padrinho do Lucas) te esperamos! Rezamos por ti, pequenino Queiroz Foust! E te esperamos com Esperança e Amor nos nossos corações…

Emily Dickinson, “almost a poem a day”

Hoje, pretendo unir três pessoas que aprendi a amar, desde que comecei a ler os poemas de Emily DICKINSON.
Dona Aíla, como sabem meus 3 leitores: a minha tradutora predileta de Emily, está hoje ao lado de Helen VENDLER, autora celebrada de “Dickinson, Selected Poems and Commentaries” (Harvard University Press, London, 2010, UK).

Aos que gostam de aprofundar suas leituras em crítica literária, recomendo a resenha do Washington Post ao livro de Helen Vendler no WP, que sintetizo com esse parágrafo:

“Emily Dickinson is certainly never going to be an easy poet to understand, but her dense, poignant lyrics are now a lot more accessible to ordinary readers thanks to Vendler’s unravelings. If you’re going to read Dickinson, this “selected poems and commentary” is the place to start.”

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) deixou perto de 1.800 poemas. Segundo Vendler, “em alguns anos apaixonados, escreveu quase um poema por dia.” Dickinson ficou solteirona, como se sabe — “Myself the only Kangaroo among the Beauty” – cita Vendler. Aparentemente, isso parece vergonhoso, a reclusa solteirona, uma boa mulher cristã morando num lugar calmo do povoado de Amherst, em Massachusetts. Mas a vida interior é bem diferente , pois esta convicta cristã também não é convencional (*). Na visão do eminente crítico Harold Bloom, Dickinson foi simplesmente “the best mind to appear among Western poets in nearly four centuries.”
Selecionei do volume da professora Vendler um poema que trago na tradução de dona Aíla de Oliveira Gomes. Enjoy it, guys.

I CAN wade Grief —
Whole pools of it —   
I ’m used to that.   
But the least push of joy   
Breaks up my feet,          
And I tip—drunken.   
Let no pebble smile,   
’T was the new liquor,—   
That was all!  

Power is only pain —           
Stranded, through discipline,   
Till weights — will hang.   
Give Balm — to giants —  
And they ’ll wilt, like men —
Give Himmaleh,—           
They ’ll Carry — him!

++++++++++++++++

Tradução de Aíla de Oliveira Gomes:

Na dor eu passo a vau —
Charcos inteiros —
Questão de hábito.
Mas um leve esbarro de alegria
Me embaralha os pés,
Perco o equilíbrio — ébria.
Que nenhum seixo se ria —
Bebida inédita —
É só isto!

A força não é mais que dor
No encalhe da disciplina
Até suportar mais fardos.
Dêem bálsamo a gigantes
E — como homens —
Fracos, vergam.
Dêem-lhes o Himalaia —
Eles O carregam!
(252)
——
Fonte: “Emily Dickinson uma Centena de Poemas”. Tradução, introdução e notas de Aíla de Oliveira Gomes. T.A.Queiroz/USP. S.Paulo, 1984, pág. 54/55. (*) Ser não convencional, é notável em muitos outros poetas e escritores (inclusive muitos santos e santas). VENDLER, Helen.
“Dickinson, Selected Poems and Commentaries” (Harvard University Press, London, 2010, UK).
Veja páginas anexadas abaixo. Todos os direitos reservados ©VENDLER, Helen.
Post-post: Parafraseando Helen Vendler que afirma: “this is a book to be browsed in, as the reader becomes interested in one or another of the poems … on here”. Assim também este meu sítio… que pode prover leituras e comentários de dona Aíla (e uns poucos meus) sobre os poemas de Emily D. Recomendo também o catálogo de poemas falados (lidos) da autora. Amplie a experiência da leitura.
Para ouvir Emily Dickinson
, poemas lidos por nativos do inglês que nos dão nuances das técnicas poéticas de Emily. Vale a pena visitar o Emily Dickinson no LibriVox e conhecer este e outros poemas da série já publicada e d’outras.

Vendler 1Vendler 2 
Vendler 3Vendler 4

 

Emily Dickinson, “almost a poem a day”

Hoje, pretendo unir três pessoas que aprendi a amar, desde que comecei a ler os poemas de Emily DICKINSON.
Dona Aíla, como sabem meus 3 leitores: a minha tradutora predileta de Emily, está hoje ao lado de Helen VENDLER, autora celebrada de “Dickinson, Selected Poems and Commentaries” (Harvard University Press, London, 2010, UK).

Aos que gostam de aprofundar suas leituras em crítica literária, recomendo a resenha do Washington Post ao livro de Helen Vendler no WP, que sintetizo com esse parágrafo:

“Emily Dickinson is certainly never going to be an easy poet to understand, but her dense, poignant lyrics are now a lot more accessible to ordinary readers thanks to Vendler’s unravelings. If you’re going to read Dickinson, this “selected poems and commentary” is the place to start.”

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) deixou perto de 1.800 poemas. Segundo Vendler, “em alguns anos apaixonados, escreveu quase um poema por dia.” Dickinson ficou solteirona, como se sabe — “Myself the only Kangaroo among the Beauty” – cita Vendler. Aparentemente, isso parece vergonhoso, a reclusa solteirona, uma boa mulher cristã morando num lugar calmo do povoado de Amherst, em Massachusetts. Mas a vida interior é bem diferente , pois esta convicta cristã também não é convencional (*). Na visão do eminente crítico Harold Bloom, Dickinson foi simplesmente “the best mind to appear among Western poets in nearly four centuries.”
Selecionei do volume da professora Vendler um poema que trago na tradução de dona Aíla de Oliveira Gomes. Enjoy it, guys.

I CAN wade Grief —
Whole pools of it —   
I ’m used to that.   
But the least push of joy   
Breaks up my feet,          
And I tip—drunken.   
Let no pebble smile,   
’T was the new liquor,—   
That was all!  

Power is only pain —           
Stranded, through discipline,   
Till weights — will hang.   
Give Balm — to giants —  
And they ’ll wilt, like men —
Give Himmaleh,—           
They ’ll Carry — him!

++++++++++++++++

Tradução de Aíla de Oliveira Gomes:

Na dor eu passo a vau —
Charcos inteiros —
Questão de hábito.
Mas um leve esbarro de alegria
Me embaralha os pés,
Perco o equilíbrio — ébria.
Que nenhum seixo se ria —
Bebida inédita —
É só isto!

A força não é mais que dor
No encalhe da disciplina
Até suportar mais fardos.
Dêem bálsamo a gigantes
E — como homens —
Fracos, vergam.
Dêem-lhes o Himalaia —
Eles O carregam!
(252)
——
Fonte: “Emily Dickinson uma Centena de Poemas”. Tradução, introdução e notas de Aíla de Oliveira Gomes. T.A.Queiroz/USP. S.Paulo, 1984, pág. 54/55. (*) Ser não convencional, é notável em muitos outros poetas e escritores (inclusive muitos santos e santas). VENDLER, Helen.
“Dickinson, Selected Poems and Commentaries” (Harvard University Press, London, 2010, UK).
Veja páginas anexadas abaixo. Todos os direitos reservados ©VENDLER, Helen.
Post-post: Parafraseando Helen Vendler que afirma: “this is a book to be browsed in, as the reader becomes interested in one or another of the poems … on here”. Assim também este meu sítio… que pode prover leituras e comentários de dona Aíla (e uns poucos meus) sobre os poemas de Emily D. Recomendo também o catálogo de poemas falados (lidos) da autora. Amplie a experiência da leitura.
Para ouvir Emily Dickinson
, poemas lidos por nativos do inglês que nos dão nuances das técnicas poéticas de Emily. Vale a pena visitar o Emily Dickinson no LibriVox e conhecer este e outros poemas da série já publicada e d’outras.

Vendler 1Vendler 2 
Vendler 3Vendler 4

 

O código da vida

DSC00883

  1. A vida humana é um código”, alerta o poeta Murilo Mendes ( “O Discípulo de Emaús” – 1945 ).
    E como os códigos e sua forma única (?) de decifrá-los está na moda, a frase 96, me salta aos olhos no meio da manhã, em que volto a ver o sol.
  2. Dificuldades de compreensão de tudo podem ser resolvidas em sonhos, mas é provável que exijam mais de nossa emoção do que de toda a razão humana.
  3. Decifrar começa por decifrar-se.
  4. Que elementos – feito as lesmas no romance do poeta de minha terra – nos convidam a imaginar o mundo como um código, desde que tão cedo começamos a pensar o mundo?
  5. Melancolia a do que não se permite decifrar-se. Será a melancolia o estado anterior à pesquisa de si mesmo?!
  6. “…mas Deus nos fornece elementos para decifrá-lo”.
    O código está em nossas mentes. E parece disponível a todos. Basta a disposição de nos comunicarmos com o Divino Pai Eterno. E eis que o algoritmo se expõe.

 

O código da vida

DSC00883

  1. A vida humana é um código”, alerta o poeta Murilo Mendes ( “O Discípulo de Emaús” – 1945 ).
    E como os códigos e sua forma única (?) de decifrá-los está na moda, a frase 96, me salta aos olhos no meio da manhã, em que volto a ver o sol.
  2. Dificuldades de compreensão de tudo podem ser resolvidas em sonhos, mas é provável que exijam mais de nossa emoção do que de toda a razão humana.
  3. Decifrar começa por decifrar-se.
  4. Que elementos – feito as lesmas no romance do poeta de minha terra – nos convidam a imaginar o mundo como um código, desde que tão cedo começamos a pensar o mundo?
  5. Melancolia a do que não se permite decifrar-se. Será a melancolia o estado anterior à pesquisa de si mesmo?!
  6. “…mas Deus nos fornece elementos para decifrá-lo”.
    O código está em nossas mentes. E parece disponível a todos. Basta a disposição de nos comunicarmos com o Divino Pai Eterno. E eis que o algoritmo se expõe.